Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Send Global Warming Memo to Midwest

That is, the Midwestern United States. Every time we talk to my parents or our friends back in Wisconsin they tell us of the terrible cold that has pounded the Midwest this winter. My mom was delayed by snow in two cities on her way to Germany in February.

An acquaintance recently said, while discussing the subject of global warming, there is definitely a change. I can't say exactly what it is, but it is definitely a change. What he noticed was that winter seems to start later, in December or even January and go through March and sometimes April. But, then you see this crazy weather in the Midwest, a real winter so to say. Here in Europe people say that the hurricane level winds coming off the ocean are increasing. There is definitely something changing in our climate. It seems to me it would take one person two or three lifetimes to determine what is happening what the true causes and effects are, but what do I know.

4 comments:

Briteeyes said...

hey tammie, I am needing your email address so I can invite you to read our blog, I have to change it to invite only....

Maria said...

I was just in MN for my grandpa's funeral, and we all sat around talking (three generations). The discovery? That this winter is what winter had previously been like, but due to some ridiculously warm winters with no (or little) snow, people had forgotten what winter was like! That being said, the poor southeast is suffering a horrid drought. Changes in the weather, and ultimately climate, have been historically documented, and whether or not "we" are speeding up those changes is what it is.

I could write a book, but I'll stop now. LOL!

Gardner said...

@Maria - That's interesting about MN and the winter like the days of old. And a drought to in the southeast. As I recall if we had snow in the Midwest, the southeast usually got rain (same low pressure, just warmer). Weird.

Maria said...

It is strange re: the southeast. There are some serious water supply concerns for the region-- especially Georgia and Alabama. Lake Lanier is critically low.

I probably wouldn't pay such close attention, but I work for the Corps of Engineers, and I like to keep up with what the other districts are doing.

March 2007